How vaping is linked to gum disease and wounds that won’t heal.

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When Irfan Rahman talked to young vapers, some complained of bleeding mouths and throats. And these bloody sores seemed slow to heal. Such reports concerned this toxicologist at the University of Rochester in New York. So he decided to investigate what the vapors inhaled from electronic cigarettes might be doing to mouth cells.

Last October, his team showed those vapors inflame mouth cells in ways that could potentially promote gum disease. That gum damage can destroy the tissues that hold teeth in place. So severe gum disease could lead to tooth loss.

But that’s hardly the end of it.

Read Article:  https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/concerns-explode-over-new-health-risks-vaping

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To become Australians, these spiders crossed an ocean

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It’s easy to think that the globe’s vast oceans would be effective barriers to the movement of land animals. An elephant can’t swim across the Pacific, after all. But it turns out that plenty of plants and animals — and even people — have unintentionally floated across oceans from one continent to another. Now comes evidence that tiny, sedentary trapdoor spiders made such a journey millions of years ago. That voyage took them from Africa all the way across the Indian Ocean to Australia.

Moggridgea rainbowi spiders can be found on Kangaroo Island. It sits off the south coast of Australia. These trapdoor spiders build a silk-lined burrow in the ground with a secure-fitting lid, notes Sophie Harrison. She is a biologist in Australia at the University of Adelaide. The burrow and trapdoor provide these spiders with shelter and protection. It also offers them an out-of-sight spot from which to await approaching prey. And it means that the spiders don’t really need to travel more than a few meters (yards) over the course of a lifetime.

Read Article:  https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/become-australians-these-spiders-crossed-ocean

How to create your very own 3D printer.

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Swedish inventor Torbjørn Ludvigsen has spent the last three years developing a new kind of large-format 3D printer that can build furniture-sized objects in any room — surprisingly easily and relatively cheaply. Ludvigsen’s invention, the Hangprinter, employs a system of wires and computer-controlled pulleys anchored to the walls, floor, and ceiling. Once installed, the Hangprinter essentially uses the room itself as a casing.

Read Article:  https://www.livescience.com/58250-hangprinter-system-turns-entire-room-into-3d-printer.html

An amazing discovery: an underwater octopus city, with about 15 inhabitants.

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Scientists have discovered a small octopus city – dubbed Octlantis – a find that suggests members of the gloomy octopus species (Octopus tetricus) are perhaps not the isolated and solitary creatures we thought they were.

Octlantis features dens made out of piles of sand and shells, and is home to up to 15 of the cephalopods, according to marine biologists. They recorded 10 hours of video footage of the site, which lies 10 to 15 metres (33 to 49 feet) under the water and measures 18 by 4 metres (59 by 13 feet).

Read Article:  https://www.sciencealert.com/marine-biologists-discover-an-underwater-octopus-city-they-re-calling-octlantis

Irish beach washed away 33 years ago reappears overnight

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(by Henry McDonald, The Guardian, May 8, 2017) – An Irish beach that disappeared more than 30 years ago has returned to an island off the County Mayo coast.

The sand at Dooagh, Achill Island, was washed away by storms in 1984, leaving only rocks and rock pools.

But after a freak tide around Easter this year, hundreds of tons of sand were deposited around the area where the beach once stood, recreating the old 300-metre stretch of golden sand.

Sean Molloy, manager at Achill Tourism, said local people were delighted to have the beach back.

Read Article:  https://www.studentnewsdaily.com/blog/human-interest-news-stories/irish-beach-reappears-overnight/

Artificial ‘skin’ gives robotic hand a sense of touch

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A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices.

Read Article:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170913193055.htm

After 13 years, space probe Cassini will destroy itself soon, torn apart in Saturn’s atmosphere.

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The $4bn (£3bn) mission is ending 13 years of discoveries at the ringed planet by ditching itself in the atmosphere.

With an expected entry speed of 120,000km/h (76,000mph), the spacecraft will rapidly be torn to pieces.

Scientists, however, hope to gain new information on the chemical composition of Saturn’s gases just before Cassini loses radio contact with Earth.

Read Article:  http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-41207827

A fascinating article about “rotor sails”, a new, more efficient way to power ocean-going ships.

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Early next year, a tanker vessel owned by Maersk, the Danish transportation conglomerate, and a passenger ship owned by Viking Cruises will be outfitted with spinning cylinders on their decks. Mounted vertically and up to 10 stories tall, these “rotor sails” could slash fuel consumption up to 10%, saving transportation companies hundreds of thousands of dollars and cutting soot-causing carbon emissions by thousands of tons per trip.

Read Article: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/09/spinning-metal-sails-could-slash-fuel-consumption-emissions-cargo-ships